Culture Waitaki Blog

The collaborative blog of Culture Waitaki, featuring thoughts and ideas from the Forrester Gallery, North Otago Museum, Waitaki District Libraries and Waitaki District Archive.

  • Bentwood Chair

    Bentwood chairs were first made in the early 1850s by the Austrian Michael Thonet. Manufacture of these chairs soon spread to other countries. They were incredibly popular over the next century as they were cheap and easy to import.

  • The Yardley Chair

    This chair was made by Walter John Yardley in Palmerston in 1866. Yardley was born in 1842 and so would have been 24 when he made the chair. Walter worked as a haulage carrier, driving a team of horses around the district, delivering goods and supplies.

  • Movable Type Exhibition 2015

    The Albion Press is an early cast-iron hand-printing press. It was first designed in 1820 by Richard Whittaker Cope and later manufactured by Hopkinson Cope and other licensees until the 1930s.

  • Movable Type Exhibition 2015

    The North Otago Museum has a small collection of printers and printing-related objects from the era of movable type. These range from the large and heavy cast iron Albion Press invented in 1820 right through to early typewriters like the Remington 12 invented a century later in 1922.

  • Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt

    This edition of Current Reads comes to you from one of our lovely BookChat members Jan. Here she reviews a nonfiction/graphic novel called the Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston. You can find this book on the graphic novel shelves at the Oamaru Public Library.

  • A Year of Marvellous Ways

    This installment of Current Reads comes to you from our Community Services/Deputy Manager Jean Rivett.

    Her current read is A Year of Marvellous Ways by Sarah Winman. You can find this book on the fiction shelves at Oamaru Library.

  • This is the final blog in a series of four focussed on the history of the North Otago Museum.

  • Pioneer Gallery custodian Neville F Turner with school children and moa bones. Waitaki District Archive 4444

    This is the third blog in a series of four focussed on the history of the North Otago Museum.

  • Thomas Forrester with microscopes in his workshop, Wharfe Street, Oamaru

    This is the second blog in a series of four focussed on the history of the North Otago Museum.

  • wonderlab

    On Friday I made a visit to St Kevins to work with a group of year 7 students from St Josephs. Their topic was ceramics so it was very exciting that I took a tub of ceramics from the Museum's New Zealand Pottery collection.

  • The Burns Memorial Exhibition 2015

    Oh my goodness the children in North Otago have been busy making art lately! In the last few days the back room and top galleries have been getting full of work coming in for the Burns Memorial Exhibition-opening 12 September.

  • School Visits

    Jane and I have been out and about alot over the last month or so visiting schools and seeing some new countryside. It has been great meeting principals and teachers at big schools and smaller schools, from Morven to Palmerston.

  • New Zealand Exhibition Building, Dunedin 1865

    This is the first blog in a series of four focussed on the history of the North Otago Museum.

  • Girl on the Train

    This installment of Current Reads comes to you from our Overdues Library Assistant Zuni Steer.

    Her current read is The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. You can find this book on the fiction shelves at Oamaru Library.

  • David Eggleton

    On Thurday 27th August 2015, the Oamaru Library hosted performance poet David Eggleton as part of our celebrations for National Poetry Day.  David  has increasingly been recognised as a distinctive voice in the development of a localised New Zealand poetic language.

  • Washing Display

    Over the last few months we have been sorting out our washing collection. The collection gives a good overview of the technological development that occurred throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  • VALE Washing Machine

    This very basic electric washing machine was donated to the North Otago Museum in 1994. The body is a tin case into which has been inserted a brass interior with a stainless steel rim.  At the bottom of the interior is a large element, next to which is a hole for the water to drain.

  • New Zealand Memorial at Chunuk Bair

    One hundred years ago New Zealand soldiers were involved in the Battle for Chunuk Bair. This battle is considered New Zealand’s most important action in the Gallipoli Campaign.

  • Mangle

    Mangles were used to wring water from wet laundry. This one, manufactured by GH & G Nicoll in Dundee, is one of several in the North Otago Museum’s collection. Using a mangle after washing clothes considerably sped up the drying process.

  • Washboard

    Washing boards were a very early way of washing clothes. This washing board was sold by AJ Headland in his shop on Thames St around 1890. The frame is wood, while the grooves used to agitate and remove dirt are metal.

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